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EEL 3701
Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering Revision
Page 1/4 LAB 2: MSI Circuits
OBJECTIVES
The objective of this lab is to familiarize students with the
structure, design, and operation of two MSI (medium scale
integrated) devices, i.e., a multiplexer and a decoder.
Students will design and build these two devices using SSI
(small-scale integrated) components and then design a
circuit to implement an equation with SSI and MSI devices.

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EEL 3701
Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering Revision
Page 1/4 LAB 2: MSI Circuits
OBJECTIVES
The objective of this lab is to familiarize students with the
structure, design, and operation of two MSI (medium scale
integrated) devices, i.e., a multiplexer and a decoder.
Students will design and build these two devices using SSI
(small-scale integrated) components and then design a
circuit to implement an equation with SSI and MSI devices.
MATERIALS
• Prototyping board (bread board)
• Wires, Switches, LED’s, Resistor packs
• IC’s: Any SSI (no MUX or Decoder) chips available in
your base lab kits (but not your quiz kit)
• 7-segment LED data sheet
• 7-SEGMENT DISPLAYS ON MAX 10 PCB
• You must adhere to the Lab Rules and Policies document
for every lab. Re-read, if necessary. Documents must be
submitted through Canvas and on paper for every lab.
All pre-lab files must submitted BEFORE the beginning
of your lab.
PRE-LAB REQUIREMENTS
• You must have your MAX 10 PCB tested before
walking into the door for your Lab 2. The PIs have a
way to test your PCB in our lab. In fact, if possible,
you should have it tested prior to walking into the door
for your Lab 1!
• Only program pins that are available externally on the
MAX 10, as shown in the Appendix. When using the
7-segment displays, you can also use MAX 10 pins
specified in the 7-SEGMENT DISPLAYS ON MAX 10
PCB document.
• A single pdf document (for this lab, called
Lab2.pdf) of all design files (bdf or vhdl) and
simulation files is required for this and all pre-labs. I
suggest that you capture screen shots of each design
and simulation (as they are generated) into a MS-Word
(or equivalent) file and then save it as a pdf file. This
file should also include any other required items
including truth/voltage tables, or anything else
specifically requested in the lab document or required
in the Lab Rules and Policies.
• As usual, submit through Canvas your Pre-Lab Report
pdf file (Lab2.pdf) and the three Quartus archive
files that you generate in the pre-lab sections.
Part A. Multiplexer Design
The multiplexer (MUX) is a device that acts as a multiposition switch. See Figure 1. A number of DATA inputs
are applied to this device (D0-D3) and one of the inputs is
switched to the output (Y) of the device. A binary number
applied to the SELECT (S1 & S0) lines controls which
input is passed to the output. For example, when S1=S0=0,
D0 is “logically” connected to the output Y. When S1=0
& S0=1, D1 “logically” connected to Y and so forth for D2
& D3 to connect to Y. Notice that some of the inputs are
active-low and some are active-high; the output is activelow.
Part A. Mux Pre-Lab Requirements
1. Draw a truth table for the 4-input multiplexer (6
inputs and 1 output) using “wild cards” as appropriate.
Wild cards, usually designated with an “*” (or a “–”),
indicate that any value can replace it. If one * exists
in a row of a truth table, the one row represents two
rows; one with the * replaced by a 0 and the other with
the * replaced by a 1. If there are two asterisks in a
single row, that row is an abbreviation for four rows.
2. Derive the logic equation for this MUX from the truth
table (both an SOP and a POS).
3. Draw a voltage table for this MUX. The figure shows
that some of the D inputs and both of the S inputs are
active-high; some of the D inputs and the output are
active-low. Draw a functional block diagram of the
MUX; draw signal definitions (i.e., activation levels
and signal names outside the MUX).
4. Design a circuit for this MUX using logic gates
available in the ICs listed above in the “Materials”
section. Use project name lab2_MUX. (It is usually
easier to design first on paper.) There is no
requirement, in this lab, to minimize the number of
gates or chips; but of course a simpler design will be
easier to build.)
5. If you designed the circuit in part 4 on paper, now
design it using Quartus (with filename
lab2_MUX.bdf) and then simulate the complete
mixed-logic circuit in Quartus. As usual, when using
discrete logic chips, i.e., 74’xx ICs, add pin numbers
and chip labels to the logic circuit diagram to make
this a wiring diagram. Use this circuit design to build
the circuit in item 7, below. When you creating
designs exclusively with the MAX 10 (i.e., without
other ICs, as in item 8, below), it is NOT necessary to
use 74’xx pin and chip labels. But when the design is
done for the MAX 10, put the design AFTER adding
the MAX 10 pin labels into your Pre-Lab Report.
Annotate the simulation in your lab report.
6. In addition to the requirements specified above, items
to be included in your Pre-Lab Report always include
logic equation truth table(s), voltage table(s), circuit
schematic(s) (with chip and pin numbers), and
simulation results. As usual, all pre-lab files must be
submitted prior to the start of your lab.
7. Build your MUX circuit on your bread boards with
parts in your lab kit (but do not use the parts reserved
4-input Multiplexer
D0
D1
D2
D3
Y
S0 S1
Figure 1: 4-input MUX.
University of Florida EEL 3701 — Fall 2019 Dr. Eric M. Schwartz
Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering Revision 1 12-Sep-19
Page 2/4 LAB 2: MSI Circuits
for your lab quiz specified here). You will need switch
circuits for the inputs and an LED circuit for the
output. Test this design with discrete elements. Use
the truth table to demonstrate (to yourself) that your
MUX circuit operates correctly by connecting
appropriate switch circuits to all six inputs and an
active-low LED circuit to the output. Use your truth
table.
8. In item 7 above, you built a MUX with gates on 74’xx
ICs; in this part you will build the MUX with your
MAX 10 PCB. Program your MAX 10 with your
MUX design. Test your MAX 10 solution using the
same inputs as your solution from the previous
section (i.e., use the same switches for both the part 7
and part 8 designs). You must use different outputs
(two LED circuits, one for item 7 and one for item 8).
Use your truth table to demonstrate (to yourself) that
your MUX circuit (using the MAX 10 PCB) operates
correctly (and the same as the circuit from item 7).
9. Submit your archive file through Canvas. It should
have filename lab2_MUX.qar.
10. Always make a legend (as described in Lab 1) for the
input switches. Always include the legend in your prelab report and have it available to your PI during your
demonstrations. Note that LED’s should always be lit
when the related signal is true (whether that means that
the signal is high or that it is low).
Part B. Decoder Design
In this part of the lab you will design a Hex to 7-segment
Decoder. This decoder will take 4-inputs (a hexadecimal
number) to drive 7 active-high outputs that will in turn
drive a 7-segment LED. (Two 7-segment LED devices
were provided in your lab kit.) Figure 2 shows a block
diagram of the part that you are required to design.
Figure 3 shows the arrangement of each of the LEDs on the
7-segment LED device. Each of the LEDs are active-high.
The T input is used to test the outputs; when T is true, all
of the outputs A through G are true.
Part B. Decoder Pre-Lab Requirements
1. Draw a truth table for the above decoder.
2. Derive the logic equations for each of the outputs from
the truth table (either a SOP or a POS).
3. Draw voltage table for the above decoder.
4. Draw a functional block diagram of the Decoder; draw
signal definitions (i.e., activation levels and signal
names outside the Decoder).
5. Design a circuit to implement the decoder using SSI
parts only (i.e., AND, NAND, BNAND, NOT, …).
Use project name lab2_decoder. (It is usually
easier to design first on paper.) A partially completed
and well-formatted design, hex_to_7seg.bdf, is
available on our website. You may copy the designs in
this file and augment them with your own designs or
design the entire circuit yourself. Note that you are
required to design a POS circuit for the decoder’s A
and B outputs.
6. If you designed the circuit in part 5 on paper, now
design it using Quartus (with filename
lab2_decoder.bdf) and then simulate the
complete mixed-logic circuits in Quartus. There is no
requirement, in this lab, to minimize the number of
gates or chips. Annotate the simulation in your lab
report.
7. In addition to the requirements specified above, items
to be included in your Pre-Lab Report always include
logic equation truth table(s), voltage table(s), circuit
schematic(s), and simulation. As usual, all pre-lab
files must be submitted prior to the start of your lab.
8. Submit your archive file through Canvas. It should
have filename lab2_decoder.qar.
9. Add your decoder design to the MUX design from Part
A so that your MAX 10 contains both designs. Add
the necessary switch circuits to your breadboard to
drive (generate the required inputs) for your Hex to 7-
segment Decoder.
10. Add the 7-segment LED PCB to your breadboard.
11. See the 7-SEGMENT DISPLAYS ON MAX 10 PCB
document for information to correctly link the decoder
outputs A through G to the appropriate MAX 10 pins.
You may use either of the two 7-segment displays.
12. Demonstrate (to yourself) that your MUX circuit and
Hex to 7-segment Decoder circuit both operate
correctly.
13. Always make a legend (as described in Lab 1) for the
input switches. Always include the legend in your prelab report and have it available to your PI during your
demonstrations. Note that LED’s should always be lit
when the related signal is true.
Part C. MUX Implementation
In this part of the lab, you will design two circuits, each to
implement the equation,
???? = ??��� ?? (?? + ??) + ?? ??� ??� .
Figure 2: Hex to 7-segment decoder.
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
X0
X1
X2
X3
T
Hex to
7-segment
Decoder
Figure 3: LED arrangement on 7-segment display.
University of Florida EEL 3701 — Fall 2019 Dr. Eric M. Schwartz
Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering Revision 1 12-Sep-19
Page 3/4 LAB 2: MSI Circuits
For each of the circuits, you will use a 4-input MUX, along
with a few SSI gates. When you build the circuits, first in
Quartus and then on your bread board, you will use a
74’153 dual-MUX device inside Quartus, i.e., not with a
74’153 chip on your breadboard. First you will design a
circuit to implement this equation without using the MUX
enable and then you will design a second circuit to
implement the equation using the MUX enable.
Part C. MUX Implementation Pre-Lab Requirements
1. When you use Quartus to design with a 74’153 MUX
(available under others|maxplus2|74153, and
shown in Figure 4), you will find that the select lines
are labeled A and B. Which
select inputs correspond to
A and B for you MUX?
Verify the functioning of a
74’153 MUX (and if A B
=S1 S0 or A B = S0 S1) by
creating a new Quartus
circuit (in a new project and
file, Lab2_MUX_TEST)
using only this chip, inputs,
and outputs. Simulate this
design using enough
different input
combinations to prove that
the 74’153 works as you
suspect it should. Note: For
every “new” part you use (like the 74’153), if you are
not sure of a pins function, you should verify its
operation before using it in a circuit. Include this
design and simulation in your pre-lab document.
Submit the archive file Lab2_MUX_TEST.qar
through Canvas.
• Create a truth table for the above equation.
• Derive both MSOP and MPOS logic expressions for
the equation. (You may use K-maps, if desired.)
• Design a circuit (lab2_EQU.bdf in project
lab2_EQU) to implement this equation with a single
74’153 chip (in Quartus) and (only if necessary) the
gates available on 74’00, 74’02, and/or 74’04 ICs. But
do not use the MUX enable in this design.Your design
must (non-trivially) use a 74’153. Use the MUX select
lines as follows: S1 = W(H) and S0 = Y(H). Note that
the 74’153 (see Figure 4) includes two 4-input
MUX’s.
• Make a voltage table from the truth table and the
activation-levels that you chose above.
• Simulate your design using Quartus to verify that your
design works (by comparing it to the voltage table).
• Design another circuit in the same lab2_EQU.bdf
that implements the same equation (below), but calls
the output F1 (instead of F0) and this time uses the
MUX enable.
???? == ??��� ?? (?? + ??) + ?? ??� ??�
• Add the new F1 output to your previous Quartus
simulation to verify that both of your design works.
Submit your archive file (lab2_EQU.qar) through
Canvas.
• Add your second design to the MUX and Decoder
designs from Parts A and B so that your MAX 10
contains all three designs in new project called
lab2_ALL. Add the necessary switch circuits to your
breadboard to drive (generate the required inputs) for
this equation. Use LEDs to verify the F1 outputs. Note
that LED’s should always be lit when the related signal
is true. Simulate your designs using Quartus to verify
that your design works. Submit your archive file
(lab2_ALL.qar) through Canvas.
• Demonstrate (to yourself) that your MUX circuit, Hex
to 7-segment Decoder circuit, and F1 circuit operate
correctly.
• Always make a legend (as described in Lab 1) for the
input switches. Always include the legend in your prelab report and have it available to your PI during your
demonstrations.
LAB PROCEDURE
Demonstrate the functioning MUX circuit, your Hex to 7-
segment Decoder circuit, and your F1 circuit to your PI.
Figure 4: 74’153
in Quartus.
University of Florida EEL 3701 — Fall 2019 Dr. Eric M. Schwartz
Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering Revision 1 12-Sep-19
Page 4/4 LAB 2: MSI Circuits
APPENDIX
The MAX 10 pins that you can use are shown in Figures 5
and 6. Do NOT use the clock pins for general purpose
inputs or outputs, e.g., C2P (i.e., CLK2P, MAX 10 pin G9)
and C3P (i.e., CLK3P, MAX10 pin F13); use these pins
only for clock inputs. These figures are also available in the
Quartus Tutorial on our website. Information about the 7-
segment displays are also available on our website in the
document 7-Segment Displays on MAX 10 PCB.

Figure 5: PLD PCB top layer with available FPGA pins
Pin as
Chip #
Available
FPGA Pins
Available
FPGA Pins
Pin as
Chip #
1 C2P
(CLK2P) G9
C2P
(CLK2P) G9 1
2 F12 C3P
(CLK3P) F13 40
3 E3 D11 39
4 E4 E3 3
5 F4 E4 4
6 G4 F4 5
7 J7 F12 2
8 H3 G4 6
9 H2 G13 29
10 K5 H2 9
11 J2 H3 8
12 K2 H8 31
13 L2 H13 28
14 J5 J2 11
15 L5 J5 14
16 L4 J6 17
17 J6 J7 7
18 K6 J8 32
19 GND J13 27
20 GND K2 12
21 3.3 V K5 10
22 3.3 V K6 18
23 N10 K7 30
24 N12 K8 33
25 M13 K12 34
26 L13 L2 13
27 J13 L4 16
28 H13 L5 15
29 G13 L13 26
30 K7 M9 35
31 H8 M10 36
32 J8 M11 37
33 K8 M12 38
34 K12 M13 25
35 M9 N10 23
36 M10 N12 24
37 M11 GND 19
38 M12 GND 20
39 D11 3.3 V 22
40 C3P
(CLK3P) F13 3.3 V 21
Figure 6: Available FPGA pins