Sale!

COMP 204 – Assignment #5 solution

$30.00

COMP    204    – Assignment    #5

Download    cell_counting.py    and    malaria-1.jpg.
What    to    submit:
• Your    modified    cell_counting.py    file.
• The    images    produced    for    each    question,    generated    by    your    code.
In    this    assignment,    you    will    continue    the    work    started    in    class    to    develop    a    program
that    accurately    identifies red    blood    cells    in    a    microscopy    image,    and    then    counts    the
fraction    of    those    cells    that    are    infected    by    Plasmodium    Falciparum (the    causative
agent    of    malaria). We    will    analyze    the    image    below.    Each    red    blood    cell    is    a    pink,
roughly    circular    region,    often    with    a    lighter    center. Some    cells    are    infected    with
Plasmodium,    which    shows    as    a    dark-purple    ring    due    to    Giemsa    staining.    The    image
also    contains    some    additional    stuff,    like    this    very    dark    blob    in    the    center    – I    don’t
know    what    it    is…

Category:

Description

5/5 - (2 votes)

COMP    204    – Assignment    #5

Download    cell_counting.py    and    malaria-1.jpg.
What    to    submit:
• Your    modified    cell_counting.py    file.
• The    images    produced    for    each    question,    generated    by    your    code.
In    this    assignment,    you    will    continue    the    work    started    in    class    to    develop    a    program
that    accurately    identifies red    blood    cells    in    a    microscopy    image,    and    then    counts    the
fraction    of    those    cells    that    are    infected    by    Plasmodium    Falciparum (the    causative
agent    of    malaria). We    will    analyze    the    image    below.    Each    red    blood    cell    is    a    pink,
roughly    circular    region,    often    with    a    lighter    center. Some    cells    are    infected    with
Plasmodium,    which    shows    as    a    dark-purple    ring    due    to    Giemsa    staining.    The    image
also    contains    some    additional    stuff,    like    this    very    dark    blob    in    the    center    – I    don’t
know    what    it    is…
1) (10    points)    Better    edge    detection [Expected    length:    4-6    lines    of    code]
The    edge    detection    algorithm    seen    in    class    is    not    the    most    accurate.    A    more
commonly    used    edge    detector is    the Sobel    algorithm,    which    is part    of    the
skimage.filters module.    See
https://scikit-image.org/docs/dev/api/skimage.filters.html
Apply    the    Sobel    algorithm    to    image    malaria-1.jpg.    Write    your    code    in    the
dedicated    portion    of    the    cell_counting.py.    Your    code    should    save    the    resulting
image    in    a file    called    “Q1_Sobel.jpg”.    Submit    it    on    MyCourses.
Notes:
• The    Sobel    algorithm can    only    be    applied    to    graytone    images,    so    you
will    first    need to    convert    the    original    color    image    to    a    graytone    image
as    described    in    class.
• Reminder:    Grayscale    images    have    pixel    values    between    0    and    1,    not
between    0    and    255.
• Your    image    should    look    like    this:
2) (10    points)    Detecting    strong    edges     [Expected    length:    4-20    lines]
The    Sobel    algorithm measures the    “edginess”    of    a    pixel    with    a    number
between    0    and    1.    In    order    to    turn    these    real-valued    images    into    black-andwhite    images    (white    =    edges,    black    =    non-edge),    we    need    to    threshold    the
image,    i.e.    to    produce    a    new    image    where    the    pixel    value    at    location    (r,c)    is
set    to    0 if    edginess(r,c)<T,    and    to    1 if    edginess(r,c)=T,    where    T    is    a    userdefined    threshold.
Write    the    code    to    threshold    the    Sobel    edginess    image,    using    T=0.05.    Save    the
images    in    files    called    “Q2_Sobel_T_0.05.jpg”.    Your    images    should    look    like
this:
3) (10 Points) Cleaning    up    Plasmodium.    Expected    length:    [8-20    lines    of    code]
The    thresholded    images    obtained    in    question    2    include edges    corresponding
to    cell    perimeters,    as    well    as    edges    corresponding    to    the    periphery    of    the
darker    plasmodium    cells,    inserted    within red    blood    cells.    In    order    to    best
delineate    each    red    blood    cell,    we    need    to    first    remove    the    edge    pixels    caused
by    the    Plasmodium    cells.    Pixels    corresponding    to    Plasmodium    cells    tend    to
have    graytone    values    less    than    0.5.    Starting    from    the    Q2_Sobel_T_0.05.jpg
black-and-white    image,    produce    a    modified    back-and-white    image    where any
white    pixel    at    position    (r,c)    is    replaced    by    a    black    pixel if    the    value    of    pixel
(r,c)    or    of    any    of    the    8    surrounding pixels in    the    original    graytone    malaria-1
image    is    below    0.5. Save    modified    edge    image    as    “Q3_Sobel_T0.05_clean.jpg”.
This    should    give    you    the    image    below.    The    edge    pixels    caused    by
Plasmodium    are    not    completely    gone,    but    this    will    be    sufficient    anyway.
4) (20    Points)    Labeling    cells.    [Expected    length:    12-25    lines]
Write    the    fill_cells    function.    The    function    should    take    as    argument    an    edge    image
(e.g.    the    image    obtained    in    Q3),    with    black    background    and    white    edges. The
function    creates    a    new    image    that is    a    copy    of    the    edge    image    provided    as    argument,
but    with    each    closed    region    filled    with    a    different    grayscale    value (see    result    below).
This    is    achieved    by    repeatedly    calling the    seedfill    function (provided    to    you),    using
as    seed    pixel    various pixels    determined    by    your    code,    as    described    below.
Start    by    making    a    copy    of    the    edge    image,    which    is    the    one    you    will    then    modify    and
ultimately    return.    Then    call    the seedfill    from    pixel    (0,0),    with    fill_color=0.1.    This    will
mark    the    background    of    the    image    with a    dark    gray.    Then,    as    seen    in    class,    look    for
pixels    that    remain    black.    Whenever    you    find    one,    initiate    a    seedfill    from    that
location,    this    time choosing    fill_color    as    0.5+0.001*n_regions_found_so_far (where
n_regions_found_so_far    is    the    number    of    closed    regions    identified    to    date    by    your
search).    So    the    first    closed    region    will    be    colored    0.5,    the    second    0.501,    the    third
0.502,    etc.        Once    your    function    is    done    looking    at    the    entire    image,    return    the
resulting    image. Save    this    image    as    “Q4_Sobel_T_0.05_clean_filled.jpg”. When
executed    on    the image    obtained    in    Question    3,    your    function    should    return    the
image    shown    below.
Notes:
• On    my    computer,    my    code    takes    about    1    minute    to    run;    it’s    normal    that    it    is    a    bit
slow,    because    the    seedfill    function    is    not    fast    and    the    image    is    large.
• The    Sobel    edge    detection    algorithm    never    calls    edges    in    the    first    and    last    rows
and    columns    of    the    image.    This    is    why    cells    that    are    at    the    periphery    of    the    image
are    not    identified.    Do    not    worry    about    this.
5) (30    Points)    Classifying    cells. [    Expected    length:    25-50    lines    of    code]
Each    detected    closed    region is    now    labeled    with    a    different    graytone:    0.5,    0.501,
0.502,    …,    0.623.    For    each    region detected,    we    now    need    to    determine    if (i)    is    a    red
blood    cell,    and    (ii)    if    the    cell    is    infected or    not.    We    will    say    that    a    region with
grayscale    value    g is    a    valid    cell    if    its    size    is    between    1000    and    5000    pixels    (this
eliminates    tiny    closed    regions    that    are    not    actual    cells).    We    will    say    that    a    cell    is
infected    if    at    least    2%    of    the    pixels    it    contains    (those    labeled with    grayscale    value    g)
have    pixel    grayscale    value    below    0.5    in    the    original grayscale    image.
Write    the    function    classify_cells,    which    takes    as    argument:
• The    original    graytone    image
• The    labeled    image    obtained    in    Question    4
• Optional    keyword    arguments    min_size=1000,    max_size=5000,
infected_grayscale=0.5,    min_infected_percentage=0.02
The    function    should    return    a    tuple    of    two    Sets.    The    first set    should    contain    the    labels
of    cells    that    are    infected,    while    the    second    set    should    contain    the    labels    of
cells    that    not    infected    (see    below    for    the    expected    output).
There    are    many    ways    to    achieve    this    – feel    free    to    use    the    approach    you    feel    is    the
best.    One    approach    could    go    as    follows:
i. Build    a    Set    of    all    grayscale    values    observed    in    the    labeled    image
ii. Initialize    infected=set(),    not_infected=set()
iii. For    each    grayscale    value    in    the    grayscales    set:
1. Scan    the    image    to    identify    pixels    with    that    grayscale    value    in    the    labeled
image,    and    count    separately    those    that    are    dark    (<=infected_grayscale)    and
light    (infected_grayscale)    in    the    original    image.
2. Using    the    counts    of    dark    and    light    pixels,    determine    if    the    region    with    that
grayscale    value    is    a    cell    or    not,    and    whether    or    not    it    is    infected.    Add    it    to
the    infected    or    not_infected    sets,    as    appropriate.
iv. Return    the    pair    of    infected    and    not_infected    sets.
Notes:    Some    cells    actually    contain    pixels    that    are    labeled    white,    because    of    left-overs
from    the    Plasmodium    edges.    To    make    out    life    easier,    we    will    not    consider    those
pixels    as    being    part    of    the    cell.
With    my    code,    the    function    returns:
(    {0.504,    0.557,    0.522,    0.516,    0.647,    0.6,    0.629,    0.588,    0.521,    0.515,    0.529,    0.548,    0.52,    0.645,    0.535,
0.575,    0.53,    0.604,    0.649,    0.503,    0.598,    0.662,    0.547,    0.56,    0.5700000000000001,    0.66,    0.628},
{0.502,    0.5,    0.577, 0.542,    0.526,    0.5609999999999999,    0.625,    0.558,    0.619,    0.593,    0.552,    0.613,
0.578,    0.642,    0.607,    0.601,    0.54,    0.665,    0.63,    0.534,    0.659,    0.624,    0.528,    0.589,    0.653,    0.612,    0.551,
0.641,    0.571,    0.635,    0.565,    0.5680000000000001,    0.533,    0.658,    0.562,    0.527,    0.556,    0.617,    0.582,
0.646,    0.55,    0.611,    0.576,    0.64,    0.544,    0.669,    0.509,    0.538,    0.599,    0.654,    0.606,    0.67,    0.545,    0.574,
0.622,    0.648,    0.539,    0.523,    0.555,    0.532,    0.616,    0.549,    0.639,    0.543,    0.633,    0.537,    0.627,    0.531,    0.592,
0.656,    0.525,    0.65,    0.554,    0.615,    0.519,    0.644,    0.632,    0.536,    0.501,    0.657,    0.655,    0.559,    0.62,    0.524,
0.585,    0.553,    0.614,    0.518,    0.579,    0.643,    0.608,    0.573,    0.637,    0.541,    0.602,    0.567,    0.631}    )
Note    that    if    your    code    labeled    your    cells    in    a    different    order    than    my    code    did,    your
solution    will    be    different.    However,    it    should    contain    the    same    number    of    infected
and    not_infected    cells.
6) (20 Points) Displaying infected    cells    [Expected    length:    12-25    lines]
As    a    last    step,    we    will    produce    a    new    color    image    that    is    a    copy    of    the    original color
image,    but    that    highlights    in    red    cells    that    have    been    classified    as    infected,    and    in
green    cells    that    have    been    labeled    as    not    infected    (see    result    below).    This    would
allow    the    scientist    using our    program    to    verify    the    calls    that    are    made.
Write    the    annotate_image    function,    which    takes    as    arguments:
• The    original    color    image
• The    labeled    grayscale    image    obtained    in    question4
• The    Set    of    grayscale    values    corresponding    to    infected    cells    (obtained
from    question    5)
• The    Set    of    grayscale    values    corresponding    to    not    infected    cells
(obtained    from    question    5)
The    function    should    return    a    new    color    image,    corresponding    to    a    copy    of    the
original    color    image,    modified    as    follows.
The    annotated    image    should    have    the    same    pixel    values    as    the    original    image,    except
when    both    (i)    the    grayscale    of    pixel    (r,c)    corresponds    to    an infected    cell    or    not
infected    cell,    and    (ii)    at    least    one    of    the    eight    surrounding    pixels    in    the    labeled    image
is    white    (grayscale=1). The    color    at    those    pixels    should    be    set    to    red    (for    infected
cells)    or    green    (for    non-infected    cells).    Save    the    resulting    image    as
“Q6_annotated.jpg”. It    should    look    like    the    image    below.