Sale!

  Assignment 3 The addressing mode of LC‐3. 

$29.99

Category:

Description

5/5 - (2 votes)

This assignment aims to give you some experience with C programming and to help you gain  better understanding of the addressing mode of LC‐3.
Important Notes
 There are subtle differences between various C compilers. We will use the GNU compiler gcc  on login.cs.auckland.ac.nz for marking. Therefore, you MUST ensure that your submissions  compile and run on login.cs.auckland.ac.nz. Submissions that fail to compile or run on  login.cs.auckland.ac.nz will attract NO marks.   Markers will compile your program using command “gcc –o name name.c” where name.c is  the name of the source code of your program, e.g. part1.c. That is, the markers will NOT use  any compiler switches to supress the warning messages.   Markers  will  use  machine  code  that  is  different  from  the  examples  given  in  the  specifications when testing your programs.   The outputs of your programs will be checked by a program. Thus, your program’s outputs  MUST be in the EXACTLY SAME FORMAT as shown in the example given in each part. You  must make sure that the registers appear in the same order as shown in the example and  there are no extra lines.   The files containing the examples can be downloaded from Canvas and unpacked on server  with the command below:  o tar xvf A3Examples.tar.gz  As we need to return the assignment marks before the exam of this course, there is NO  possibility to extend the deadline for this assignment.      Academic Honesty
Do NOT copy other people’s code (this includes the code that you find on the Internet).
We will use Stanford’s MOSS tool to check all submissions. The tool is very “smart”. Changing  the names of the variables and shuffling the statements around will not fool the tool. In  previous years, quite a few students had been caught by the tool; and, they were dealt with  according  to  the  university’s  rules  at  https://www.auckland.ac.nz/en/about/learning‐andteaching/policies‐guidelines‐and‐procedures/academic‐integrity‐info‐for‐students.html

In this assignment, you are required to write C programs to implement a LC‐3 simulator. That is,  the programs will execute the binary code generated by LC‐3 assembler.
2

Part 1 (35 marks)
LC3Edit is used to write LC‐3 assembly programs. After a program is written, we use the LC‐3  assembler  (i.e.  the  “Translate    Assemble”  function  in  LC3Edit)  to  convert  the  assembly  program into binary executable. The binary executable being generated by LC3Edit is named  “file.obj” where “file” is the name of the assembly program (excluding the “.asm” suffix). In this  specification, a “word” refers to a word in LC‐3. That is, a word consists of two bytes. The  structure of the “file.obj” is as below:   The first word (i.e. the first two bytes) is the starting address of the program.   The subsequent words correspond to the instructions in the assembly program and the  contents of the memory locations reserved for the program using various LC‐3 directives.   In  LC‐3,  data  are  stored  in  Big‐endian  format  (refer  to  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endianness to learn more about Big‐endian format). For  example, if byte 0x12 in word 0x1234 is stored at address 0x3000, byte 0x34 is stored at  address 0x3001. This means, when you read a sequence of bytes from the executable of  an LC‐3 assembly program from a file, the most significant bit of each word is read first.  In this part of the assignment, you are required to write a C program to display each word in the  “.obj” file of a program in hexadecimal form. That is, the C program should display each binary  number stored in the “.obj” file in it corresponding hexadecimal form.   Name the C program as “part1.c”.    The name of the “.obj” file (the name of the file INCLUDES the “.obj” suffix) must be  given as a command line argument. The number of instructions in the file is NOT  limited.   In the output, each line shows the contents of one word.   The value of each word must have a “0x” prefix.   The letter digits “a” to “f” must be shown as lowercase letters.

Here is an example of the execution of the program. In this example, the LC‐3 assembly program  is as below. The name of the executable of the assembly program is “p1.obj” (markers will  probably use a file with a different name and different contents).
.ORIG X4500 LD R0, A LEA R1, B LDI R2, C AND R3, R0, R1 AND R3, R1, #0 NOT R4, R3 ADD R4, R4, #1 BRp F ADD R3, R3, #1
3

F HALT A .FILL X560A B .FILL X4507 C .FILL X4501 .END

The execution of the program is shown below. In this example, the name of the file containing  the machine instructions is p1.obj (NOTE: “p1.obj” is the exact name of the file. That is, the file  name does NOT have a ‘.txt’ suffix.). The command line argument is marked in red.
$ ./part1 p1.obj 0x4500 0x2009 0xe209 0xa409 0x5601 0x5660 0x98ff 0x1921 0x0201 0x16e1 0xf025 0x560a 0x4507 0x4501
Part 2 (46 marks)
In this part, you are required to write a C program to implement a LC‐3 simulator that is capable  of executing instruction “LD”.    Name the C program as “part2.c”.    The name of the “.obj” file (the name of the file INCLUDES the “.obj” suffix) must be  given as a command line argument. The number of instructions in the file is NOT  limited.    The state of the simulator consists of the contents of the 8 general purpose registers (i.e.  R0 to R7), the value of the program counter (i.e. PC), the contents of the instruction  register (i.e. IR), and the value of the condition code (i.e. CC).    The values in R0 to R7, PC and IR should be shown as hexadecimal value. The value of CC  is either N, Z or P.   Before the simulator starts executing a program, it should first display the initial state of  the LC‐3 machine. In the initial state, R0 to R7 and IR should all be 0; PC should be the  starting address of the program to be executed; and CC should be set to Z.    When displaying the value of R0 to R7, PC, IR and CC, a tab character (denoted as “\t” in  C) is used to separate the name of the register and the value of the register.
4

 Each hexadecimal value must have a “0x” prefix. The letter digits “a” to “f” must be  shown as lowercase letters.   After showing the initial state, the simulator should execute each instruction except the  “HALT” pseudo instruction in the “.obj” file. For this part, the simulator should display  the hexadecimal code of each LD instruction that has been executed and the state of the  LC‐3  machine  after  each  LD  instruction  is  executed.  The  hexadecimal  code  of  an  instruction is the hexadecimal form of the 16 bits used to represent the instruction. The  hexadecimal code of each LD instruction should be preceded with “after executing  instruction\t” (where \t denotes a tab character) and “0x”.    The simulator should output a line consisting of 18 “=” after displaying the state of the  LC‐3 machine.   When the execution reaches the “HALT” instruction, the simulator terminates.
Here is an example of the execution of the program. In this example, the LC‐3 assembly program  is as below. The name of the executable of the assembly program is “p2.obj” (NOTE: “p2.obj” is  the exact name of the file. That is, the file name does NOT have a ‘.txt’ suffix). Markers will  probably use a file with a different name and different contents.
.ORIG X4500 LD R0, A F HALT A .FILL X560A B .FILL X4507 C .FILL X4501 .END  The execution of the program is shown below. The command line argument is marked in red.
$ ./part2 p2.obj Initial state R0 0x0000 R1 0x0000 R2 0x0000 R3 0x0000 R4 0x0000 R5 0x0000 R6 0x0000 R7 0x0000 PC 0x4500 IR 0x0000 CC Z ================== after executing instruction 0x2001 R0 0x560a R1 0x0000 R2 0x0000 R3 0x0000 R4 0x0000 R5 0x0000 R6 0x0000 R7 0x0000 PC 0x4501 IR 0x2001 CC P
5

==================

Part 3 (3 marks)
This part is based on Part 2.    Name this program as part3.c   Expand the functionality of the simulator in part 2 to allow the simulator to execute  instruction “LEA”.   For this part, the simulator should display the hexadecimal code of each LEA instruction  that has been executed and the state of the LC‐3 machine after each LEA instruction is  executed. The hexadecimal code of each LEA instruction should be preceded with “after  executing instruction\t” (where \t denotes a tab character) and “0x”.    The simulator should output a line consisting of 18 “=” after displaying the state of the  LC‐3 machine.
Here is an example of the execution of the program. In this example, the LC‐3 assembly program  is as below. The name of the executable of the assembly program is “p3.obj” (NOTE: “p3.obj” is  the exact name of the file. That is, the file name does NOT have a ‘.txt’ suffix.). Markers will  probably use a file with a different name and different contents.
.ORIG X4500 LD R0, A LEA R1, B F HALT A .FILL X560A B .FILL X4507 C .FILL X4501 .END
The execution of the program is shown below. The command line argument is marked in red.
$ ./part3 p3.obj after executing instruction 0xe202 R0 0x560a R1 0x4504 R2 0x0000 R3 0x0000 R4 0x0000 R5 0x0000 R6 0x0000 R7 0x0000 PC 0x4502 IR 0xe202 CC P ==================
Part 4 (3 marks)
This part is based on Part 3.
6

 Name this program as part4.c   Expand the functionality of the simulator in part 3 to allow the simulator to execute  instruction “LDI”.   For this part, the simulator should display the hexadecimal code of each LDI instruction  that has been executed and the state of the LC‐3 machine after each LDI instruction is  executed. The hexadecimal code of each LDI instruction should be preceded with “after  executing instruction\t” (where \t denotes a tab character) and “0x”.    The simulator should output a line consisting of 18 “=” after displaying the state of the  LC‐3 machine.
Here is an example of the execution of the program. In this example, the LC‐3 assembly program  is as below. The name of the executable of the assembly program is “p4.obj” (NOTE: “p4.obj” is  the exact name of the file. That is, the file name does NOT have a ‘.txt’ suffix.). Markers will  probably use a file with a different name and different contents).
.ORIG X4500 LD R0, A LEA R1, B LDI R2, C F HALT A .FILL X560A B .FILL X4507 C .FILL X4501 .END
The execution of the program is shown below. The command line arguments are marked in red.
$ ./part4 p4.obj after executing instruction 0xa403 R0 0x560a R1 0x4505 R2 0xe203 R3 0x0000 R4 0x0000 R5 0x0000 R6 0x0000 R7 0x0000 PC 0x4503 IR 0xa403 CC N ==================
Part 5 (3 marks)
This part is based on Part 4.    Name this program as part5.c   Expand the functionality of the simulator in part 4 to allow the simulator to execute  instruction “AND”.
7

 For this part, the simulator should display the hexadecimal code of each AND instruction  that has been executed and the state of the LC‐3 machine after each AND instruction is  executed. The hexadecimal code of each AND instruction should be preceded with  “after executing instruction\t” (where \t denotes a tab character) and “0x”.    The simulator should output a line consisting of 18 “=” after displaying the state of the  LC‐3 machine.  Here is an example of the execution of the program. In this example, the LC‐3 assembly program  is as below. The name of the executable of the assembly program is “p5.obj” (NOTE: “p5.obj” is  the exact name of the file. That is, the file name does NOT have a ‘.txt’ suffix.). Markers will  probably use a file with a different name and different contents).
.ORIG X4500 LD R0, A LEA R1, B LDI R2, C AND R3, R0, R1 AND R3, R1, #0 F HALT A .FILL X560A B .FILL X4507 C .FILL X4501 .END

The execution of the program is shown below. The command line arguments are marked in red.
$ ./part5 p5.obj after executing instruction 0x5601 R0 0x560a R1 0x4507 R2 0xe205 R3 0x4402 R4 0x0000 R5 0x0000 R6 0x0000 R7 0x0000 PC 0x4504 IR 0x5601 CC P ================== after executing instruction 0x5660 R0 0x560a R1 0x4507 R2 0xe205 R3 0x0000 R4 0x0000 R5 0x0000 R6 0x0000 R7 0x0000 PC 0x4505 IR 0x5660 CC Z ==================
Part 6 (3 marks)
8

This part is based on Part 5.    Name this program as part6.c   Expand the functionality of the simulator in part 5 to allow the simulator to execute  instruction “NOT”.   For this part, the simulator should display the hexadecimal code of each NOT instruction  that has been executed and the state of the LC‐3 machine after each NOT instruction is  executed. The hexadecimal code of each NOT instruction should be preceded with  “after executing instruction\t” (where \t denotes a tab character) and “0x”.    The simulator should output a line consisting of 18 “=” after displaying the state of the  LC‐3 machine.  Here is an example of the execution of the program. In this example, the LC‐3 assembly program  is as below. The name of the executable of the assembly program is “p6.obj” (NOTE: “p6.obj” is  the exact name of the file. That is, the file name does NOT have a ‘.txt’ suffix.). Markers will  probably use a file with a different name and different contents).
.ORIG X4500 LD R0, A LEA R1, B LDI R2, C AND R3, R0, R1 AND R3, R1, #0 NOT R4, R3 F HALT A .FILL X560A B .FILL X4507 C .FILL X4501 .END
The execution of the program is shown below. The command line arguments are marked in red.
$ ./part6 p6.obj after executing instruction 0x98ff R0 0x560a R1 0x4508 R2 0xe206 R3 0x0000 R4 0xffff R5 0x0000 R6 0x0000 R7 0x0000 PC 0x4506 IR 0x98ff CC N ==================

Part 7 (3 marks)
This part is based on Part 6.    Name this program as part7.c
9

 Expand the functionality of the simulator in part 7 to allow the simulator to execute  instruction “ADD”.   For this part, the simulator should display the hexadecimal code of each ADD instruction  that has been executed and the state of the LC‐3 machine after each ADD instruction is  executed. The hexadecimal code of each ADD instruction should be preceded with  “after executing instruction\t” (where \t denotes a tab character) and “0x”.    The simulator should output a line consisting of 18 “=” after displaying the state of the  LC‐3 machine.  Here is an example of the execution of the program. In this example, the LC‐3 assembly program  is as below. The name of the executable of the assembly program is “p7.obj” (NOTE: “p7.obj” is  the exact name of the file. That is, the file name does NOT have a ‘.txt’ suffix.). Markers will  probably use a file with a different name and different contents).
.ORIG X4500 LD R0, A LEA R1, B LDI R2, C AND R3, R0, R1 AND R3, R1, #0 NOT R4, R3 ADD R4, R4, #1 F HALT A .FILL X560A B .FILL X4507 C .FILL X4501 .END
The execution of the program is shown below. The command line arguments are marked in red.
$ ./part7 p7.obj after executing instruction 0x1921 R0 0x560a R1 0x4509 R2 0xe207 R3 0x0000 R4 0x0000 R5 0x0000 R6 0x0000 R7 0x0000 PC 0x4507 IR 0x1921 CC Z ==================

Part 8 (3 marks)
This part is based on Part 7.    Name this program as part8.c   Expand the functionality of the simulator in part 7 to allow the simulator to execute  instruction “BR”.
10

 For this part, the simulator should display the hexadecimal code of each BR instruction  that has been executed and the state of the LC‐3 machine after each BR instruction is  executed. The hexadecimal code of each BR instruction should be preceded with “after  executing instruction\t” (where \t denotes a tab character) and “0x”.    The simulator should output a line consisting of 18 “=” after displaying the state of the  LC‐3 machine.
Here is an example of the execution of the program. In this example, the LC‐3 assembly program  is as below. The name of the executable of the assembly program is “p8a.obj” (NOTE: “p8a.obj”  is the exact name of the file. That is, the file name does NOT have a ‘.txt’ suffix.). Markers will  probably use a file with a different name and different contents).
.ORIG X4500 LD R0, A LEA R1, B LDI R2, C AND R3, R0, R1 AND R3, R1, #0 NOT R4, R3 ADD R4, R4, #1 BRp F ADD R3, R3, #1 F HALT A .FILL X560A B .FILL X4507 C .FILL X4501 .END
The execution of the program is shown below. The command line arguments are marked in red.
$ ./part8 p8a.obj after executing instruction 0x0201 R0 0x560a R1 0x450b R2 0xe209 R3 0x0000 R4 0x0000 R5 0x0000 R6 0x0000 R7 0x0000 PC 0x4508 IR 0x0201 CC Z ==================
Here is another example of the execution of the program. In this example, the LC‐3 assembly  program is as below. The name of the executable of the assembly program is “p8b.obj” (NOTE:  “p8b.obj” is the exact name of the file. That is, the file name does NOT have a ‘.txt’ suffix.).  Markers will probably use a file with a different name and different contents).
.ORIG X4500 LD R0, A LEA R1, B
11

LDI R2, C AND R3, R0, R1 AND R3, R1, #0 NOT R4, R3 ADD R4, R4, #1 BRzp F ADD R3, R3, #1 F HALT A .FILL X560A B .FILL X4507 C .FILL X4501 .END  The execution of the program is shown below. The command line arguments are marked in red.
$ ./part8 p8b.obj after executing instruction 0x0601 R0 0x560a R1 0x450b R2 0xe209 R3 0x0000 R4 0x0000 R5 0x0000 R6 0x0000 R7 0x0000 PC 0x4509 IR 0x0601 CC Z ==================
Part 9 (1 mark)  1 mark for having no compile warning messages for all the submitted programs.      Submission  1. You MUST thoroughly test your program on login.cs.auckland.ac.nz before submission.  Programs that cannot be compiled or run on login.cs.auckland.ac.nz will NOT get any  mark.  2. Use command “tar cvzf A3.tar.gz part1.c part2.c part3.c part4.c part5.c part6.c part7.c  part8.c” to pack the eight C programs to file A3.tar.gz. [Note: You MUST use the tar  command on login.cs.auckland.ac.nz to pack the files as files packed using tools on PC  cannot be unpacked on login.cs.auckland.ac.nz. You will NOT get any mark if your file  cannot be unpacked on login.cs.auckland.ac.nz.]  3. Submit A3.tar.gz through Canvas. The markers will only mark your latest submission.   4. NO email submission will be accepted.

Resource
12

 The  binary  files  used  in  the  examples  of  the  specifications  are  packed  in  file  A3Examples.tar.gz.    The  scripts  used  by  the  markers  to  check  your  programs’  outputs  are  also  packed  in  A3Examples.tar.gz. To ensure that the outputs of your programs conform to the required  output  format,  I  STRONGLY  suggest  you  use  the  scripts  to  check  the  outputs  of  your  programs when you use the examples in the specification to test your programs. If the  outputs and the format of the outputs are correct, you should see a “part X passes the test”  message. WHEN YOUR PROGRAMS ARE MARKED, OUTPUTS THAT DO NOT CONFORM TO  THE REQUIRED FORMAT WILL FAIL THE TEST AND WILL GET 0 FOR THE FAILED CASES.   Follow the steps below to extract and to use the files in A3Examples.tar.gz  o Put A3Examples.tar.gz in the directory in which your programs are stored.    o Use  command  “tar  xvf  A3Examples.tar.gz”  to  unpack  A3Examples.tar.gz.  After  unpacking the file, the “.obj” files and the marking scripts should be extracted to the  same directory as your programs.  o Once you are satisfied with the outputs of your program, you can run the marking  scripts to check the outputs and the formats of the outputs of your programs using  the marking scripts. There is one marking script for each part. The marking script for  part 1 is “m1.bash”; the script for part 2 is “m2.bash”; and so on.  o To run a script, use command “./mX.bash” where X is a digit. For example, to run  the marking script for part 1, use command “./m1.bash”.   o The marking scripts only check the outputs of the programs for the examples given  in the specification.   You should create more test cases to manually test your programs. The easiest way is to use  LC‐3  assembler  to  generate  the  binary  “.obj”  file  and  upload  the  file  to  login.cs.auckland.ac.nz for testing. You can use the official LC‐3 simulator to check whether  the outputs of your programs are correct.

13

Debugging Tips
1. Debugging is a skill that you are expected to acquire. Once you start working, you are paid  to write and debug programs. Nobody is going to help you with debugging. So, you should  acquire the skill now. You can only acquire it by practicing.   2. If you get a “segmentation faults” while running a program, the best way to locate the  statement that causes the bug is to insert “printf” into your program.   3. If you can see the output of the “printf” statement, it means the bug is caused by a  statement that appears somewhere after the “printf” statement. In this case, you should  move the “printf” statement forward. Repeat this process until you cannot see the output of  the “printf” statement.   4. If you cannot see the output of the “printf” statement, it means the bug is caused by a  statement that appears somewhere before the “printf” statement.  5. Combining step 3 and 4, you should be able to identify the statement that causes the  “segmentation faults”.   6. Once you identify the statement that causes the “segmentation faults”, you can analyse the  cause of bug, e.g. whether the variables have the expected values.