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Assignment # 2: Multilevel Feedback Queue Scheduling

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CSC 4103: Operating Systems

Programming Assignment # 2: Multilevel Feedback Queue Scheduling

There are a variety of algorithms for process scheduling and each has advantages and
disadvantages. For this assignment you’ll investigate one of the more complex (and
powerful) scheduling algorithms, Multi-level Feedback Queue Scheduling. Your
solution must be written in C. This is not a team project.
First, you’ll need a queue package. Feel free to write your own, but to save time, I
suggest you use the prioque.c package I’ve provided on Moodle.

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CSC 4103: Operating Systems

Programming Assignment # 2: Multilevel Feedback Queue Scheduling

There are a variety of algorithms for process scheduling and each has advantages and
disadvantages. For this assignment you’ll investigate one of the more complex (and
powerful) scheduling algorithms, Multi-level Feedback Queue Scheduling. Your
solution must be written in C. This is not a team project.
First, you’ll need a queue package. Feel free to write your own, but to save time, I
suggest you use the prioque.c package I’ve provided on Moodle.
Your task is to simulate a three-level multi-level feedback queue scheduler. Each queue
in your scheduler will use round robin scheduling. The first level will have a small
quantum to let I/O-bound processes get through quickly. The second level will have a
medium quantum and the third level will have the largest quantum. The three queue
levels will operate under a strict priority scheme–for a process in the second or third
level queues to execute, there must be no process waiting to execute in an upper level
queue. When a process arrives in an upper level queue while a process is executing in
a lower level queue, the lower level process is immediately stripped of the CPU and
remains in place in the queue until it gets to execute again.
You should use the set of rules we discussed in class to determine which process
executes:
Rules:
• New processes at placed at the end of the highest priority queue
• If Priority(A) Priority(B), A is selected for execution
• If Priority(A) = Priority(B), use RR to schedule A and B
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• If a higher priority process arrives, the currently executing process is preempted
after the current clock tick (but stays in place in its queue)
• If a process uses its entire quantum at a particular priority b times, its priority is
reduced and it moves down one level
• If a process doesn’t use its entire quantum at a particular priority g times, its
priority is increased and it moves up one level
Notes on resetting b and g:
For promotion calculations, g can’t be reset on each I/O, because the idea is that the
process gets its full CPU need, does I/O, returns to ready queue, gets its full CPU
need, etc., without exhausting the quantum, g times in a row, to be promoted. So
the g can’t be reset when the process does an I/O, or you can’t track this.
For demotion calculations, doing an I/O resets b. The idea here is that burning
through the entire quantum b times in a row before you do I/O means the process
should be demoted. If the process does I/O before using the entire quantum, b is
reset (i.e., it has “behaved” during this execution).
The following diagram provides concrete values for the quantum (q), demotion counter
(b), and promotion counter (g) for each queue level:
A few observations:
Your scheduler simulates MLFQS and obviously isn’t part of a real operating system. A
particularly unrealistic assumption is that the scheduler itself consumes no resources,
because complicated multi-level feedback queue scheduling can be expensive if you’re
not careful. To keep time, your scheduler’s high-level structure looks something like
this:
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read all input
clock=0
while (there is at least one unterminated process) loop
if (processes should enter at current clock value) then
enqueue these processes
end if
execute highest priority process that’s ready to run for one tick
make exit, I/O, demotion, or promotion decisions
clock++
end loop
The “processes” your scheduler operates on aren’t “real” processes. Instead, your
schedule will read process specifications from standard input. These specifications
describe compute and I/O behavior. Based on a set of process specifications, your
scheduler will output scheduling decisions to standard output.
The format for input is:
5 1000 8 20 5
200 1583 1000 10 1
1500 2120 5 20 10
1500 2120 200 30 2
2500 2450 200 100 3
3200 1060 7 20 5
3200 1060 500 50 10
3200 1060 7 20 10
4000 1201 2000 100 5
4000 1201 25 50 5
4000 1201 5 20 5
TIME PID RUN I/O REPEAT
Each line of input contains information about one phase of the lifetime of a process.
The TIME value is the time the process is created and placed in the highest priority
ready queue. PID is the unique identifier for the process. RUN is the amount of time
the process runs during this phase. I/O is the amount of time required to do I/O after
running during this phase. REPEAT specifies how many times this RUN-I/O phase is
repeated, but the process shouldn’t end on an I/O; one additional RUN period
should be performed after the last I/O operation. Finally, the “TIME”, “PID”, etc.
labels are not included in the input!
Thus, a process’ simulated execution looks like this in pseudocode:
while (there’s another (RUN, I/O, REPEAT) phase for process PID) loop
for I in 1..REPEAT loop
do compute for RUN time units
do I/O for I/O time units
end loop
if (this is the last phase) then
do compute for RUN time units
end if
end loop
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When your scheduler begins, the time should be 0. Whenever there is no process to
schedule (all processes are doing I/O or no processes exist), a special process called
the null process should execute. The scheduler should continue to increment its clock
during the execution of the null process, waiting for another process to become ready.
Your scheduler should exit when all processes from the input have been executed
completely.
The required output format for your scheduler is described below. Please do NOT
improvise–you must use the required format. All output should be directed to standard
output.
When a process is created and enters the ready queue, a line like this should be
generated:
CREATE: Process 100 entered the ready queue at time 1000.
When a process gets the CPU and enters the running state:
RUN: Process 100 started execution from level 2 at time 1000; wants to execute
for 43 ticks.
…where “43 ticks” in this case is the time remaining before this process wants to do an
I/O. Of course the process may not be allowed to run for 43 clock ticks in a row before
being preempted.
When a process is placed into a queue (after being stripped of the CPU or completing
I/O):
QUEUED: Process 100 queued at level 2 at time 1000.
where the level is 1, 2, or 3. The preceding line will help someone looking at the
behavior of your scheduler to determine when processes are being moved from higher
to lower queues or vice versa.
When a process leaves the ready queues to perform I/O:
I/O: Process 100 blocked for I/O at time 1000.
When a process completes execution (there are no more phases of execution behavior
specified):
FINISHED: Process 100 finished at time 1000.
Finally, your scheduler should report the final clock time and total CPU usage of all
processes (including the < format:
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Scheduler shutdown at time 85453.
Total CPU usage for all processes scheduled:
Process < Process 100: 18843 time units.
Process 200: 1000 time units.


Use the standard classes.csc.lsu.edu submission procedures, as for
programming assignment # 1. The name of this assignment is prog2.
Documentation quality, code quality, and of course the degree to which your solution
works properly (including adherence to input/output specifications) will all be considered
when assigning a grade.
Your submitted solution must compile cleanly. If it doesn’t compile, an “F” will be
assigned. This is a complicated program. Get started early and test thoroughly.